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Sunrise, Joshua Tree NP: How it was done

June 14, 2013 Art, Technique No Comments

Sunrise, Joshua Tree National Park, California

The photograph above was taken during our Joshua Tree workshop this May. It is a single capture. Because of the dynamic range of the Phase One back that I use, and because of my processing technique, I was able to get details both in the shadows and highlights.

I initially wanted to do this image as a silhouette, the way I did in my previous visit to Joshua tree, but when I started processing the image I realized that the feeling of dawn breaking over the horizon would best be expressed by having some details in the shadows. Not a lot, but some, enough to give the feeling that night is breaking away, that we are starting to see into the shadows and that light is slowly filling the landscape, pushing away the cover of darkness and revealing details that could not be seen previously. I also want to express the feeling of warmth and color that comes with a late spring sunrise, as well as the transition between day and night.

This is why I made the top of the image a deep blue, dark enough to give the feeling of night breaking away, but not so dark that we feel it isn’t dawn yet. That’s also why I gave the lower portion of the sky, the part over the horizon, a yellow/pink/orange glow, to both echo the color of the sun rays and to contrast with the deep blue of the sky above. Color is very important in my work, and control of color is one of the aspects of digital processing that I enjoy the most and that I have learned to master over the many years I have been practicing photography.

Alain Briot
Beautiful-landscape.com

Where can you read my books and essays ?

Where my work is published

 

Luminous-Landscape.com

Michael Reichmann has published my essays on his site since 1999.   My Monthly column on Luminous-Landscape.com is titled Briot’s View.

You can read all my Briot’s View essays — over 40 of them — at this link:
http://luminous-landscape.com/columns/briots_view.shtml

 

NPN – NaturePhotographers.net

I also have a monthly column on NPN, Nature Photographers.net.

My author’s page on NPN is at this link:

http://www.naturephotographers.net/staff/abriot.html

 

And here is my May 2013 essay:

http://www.naturephotographers.net/articles0513/ab0513-1.html

 

LPM – LandscapePhotographyMagazine.com

I have a Monthly Essay Series on LandscapePhotographyMagazine.comHere is my Author’s Page on LPM :

http://landscapephotographymagazine.com/authors/

 

My April 2013 essay:

http://landscapephotographymagazine.com/2013/about-field-work/

 

And my May 2013 essay:

http://landscapephotographymagazine.com/2013/the-power-of-simplicity/

 

Foto4all.ro

I publish a Monthly column on Foto4All

The May 2013 issue features an interview of myself by Cristina Tinta:

http://www.foto4all.ro/issue/28/issue-22-23-may-june-2013.html

 

Here is the April 2013 Issue:

http://www.foto4all.ro/issue/26/issue-21-april-2013.html

 

The other issues are linked to from the magazine’s home page:

http://www.foto4all.ro/

 

Books

My books are available on Amazon and many other bookstores.

Here is my Author’s page on Amazon.com where all my books are listed:

http://www.amazon.com/Alain-Briot/e/B001JOXMFG/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

 

eBooks

All my books and essay collections are available as eBooks.  The eBooks are only available on my website at:

http://beautiful-landscape.com/Ebooks-Books-1-2-3.html

 

My Web Site

I publish essays regularly on my website.  Here is the Link to my essays page:

http://beautiful-landscape.com/Thoughts_list.html

 

This blog

And of course, you can write my writings regularly on this blog:

http://beautiful-landscape.com/Reflections

 

Thank you for your interest in my work.

Alain Briot

HDR in 2013

May 11, 2013 Art, Technique 2 Comments

HDR in 2013 by Ned Radan

 

Introduction
High Dynamic Range (HDR) images are very popular discussion in photographic books and magazines. It is also a very old procedure almost old as photography. Nowadays with availability of digital cameras and image editing software, this technique is very commonly used by photographers. For successful use of the procedure, a common sense is essential. Difficulty level is from very easy (dodging and burning in Photoshop) to hard (combining an image of the sky through branches on an image intended for large print photograph).

History
The first photographer to use this technique was Gustave Le Gray in his images shown in London in 1856. At the time negatives were more sensitive to blue light then to red and green. As a result, the sky would be rendered in white and subjects on earth in shades of grey. So he exposed one photograph for sky and the second one for subjects on the ground. When making prints two negatives were masked. One was used for sky and the other one for the ground.

Overview
Visible light, that’s what we see, can be rendered with camera with ability to capture Dynamic Range of 30 f stops. Nowadays, cameras can capture roughly 5-10 f stops in one image depending of the sophistication of a camera. As a result, a camera can capture only a window of the visible light in one single image. The intent of HDR technique is to widen this window. In simple words burned highlights and unexposed shadows in an image need to be revealed.

When to Use It
Use of HDR technique is to be avoided unless it is necessary. For example, at noon on a sunny day shadows are harsh. That means a part of rock facing the sun and part of the same rock in the shade will have different intensity of light. This difference can be several f stops. In order to photograph this subject one would need to adjust exposure for sunny side of the rock and the second exposure for the part in shade. In the office these two exposures would be combined using image editing software to create one image. The better option would be to come at the location early in the morning or late in the evening and photograph the same subject. This time only one exposure is needed because the light does not create harsh shadows.

To conclude, in some instances choosing appropriate lighting conditions gives better results than applying the HDR technique.

Application
HDR technique is a tool available to a photographer in creating a desired image. As mentioned earlier it is to the photographer‘s common sense to decide to use it or not. Some other procedures one can use instead or in combination with HDR technique:

  • Chose appropriate lighting condition. Come on the location at the dusk or down when shadows are soft.
  • Acquire an advanced camera which wider dynamic range.
  • Use artificial light (flash) or reflector to lighten the detail in the shade.

Depending on your subject and type of photography, the photographer chooses the appropriate approach.

Revealing Highlights
In some cases we can avoid HDR procedure by choosing appropriate lighting conditions, but in others this is the only way we can present a subject. For example, at sunset and sunrise sky gets spectrum of warm colors. In order to catch warm colored sky and the ground, it is necessary to use HDR technique. So take one shot for sky and the other for the ground and then combine them in an image editing software. The image (Figure 1) shows sunset, where I could not avoid HDR technique.


Illustration 1 neil radan
Figure 1: Zion Sunset

Revealing Shadows
When subject with lot of shadows is photographed, some shadows lose detail and become plain black. The best way to render such subject is to photograph it in optimal lighting condition. Sometimes we can’t camp on location, drive late in the evening or can’t afford camera with high dynamic range, so remedy is to use HDR procedure. In Figure 2 is shown example of such situation.

Illustration 2 neil radan
Figure 2: Sands of Time

How To
The simplest way to combine two images in photo editing software is to use eraser. Load up the image with most of the detail on the top layer. In the bottom layer load up an image adjusted for shadows or highlights, which ever you want to reveal on the top layer image. Make your top layer active and choose eraser soft brush with opacity 5-10%. Now go over area which you want revealed a few times. When you are happy with outcome flatten the image.

This is not the best way to combine images, but it will get you going in no time.

Summary
HDR procedure is a tool in the tool box of a photographer. At the end of the day is personal preference to use it or not and when to use it. The most important aspect is your imagination.

References:
Alain Briot, “Mastering Landscape Photography”
Beaumont NewHall, “The History of Photography”
Michael Freeman, “Pro Photographer’s D-SLR Handbook”

Neil Radan
May 2013
Brilliantlandscapes.com

 

About Adobe’s cloud-only software delivery policy

May 9, 2013 Art, Technique 4 Comments

About Adobe’s cloud-only software delivery policy

Adobe’s ‘creative cloud only’ announcement – the news that Adobe software will be available only as cloud-based subscription service instead of as traditional software packages one owns and installs on their computers-  came as a shock to most photographers who use Photoshop.

I received lots of questions about how the ‘cloud’ works and what one should do. Here are my thoughts and recommendations:

1 – Upgrade to CS6. It’s a very good upgrade and who knows it may be the last opportunity to buy Photoshop that you can keep on your computer! I have it and I’ll keep it!

2 – I have a feeling Adobe will be forced to offer an alternative to the cloud. There’s multiple reasons why, one of them being the requirement to have online access to process images in PS. What if you don’t have online access for whatever reason? No photoshop possible?

3 – What about opening photos that you created a long time ago? Impossible unless you are a cloud subscriber. This means you have to pay the monthly fee, even if you don’t need photoshop, just to open your photos? That’s not right.  Of course we can convert psd files to tiffs or other format, but when your photo library features several hundred thousand images, as mine does, that’s easier said than done!

4 –  Here is the ‘official information’ from Adobe:

http://www.adobe.com/products/creativecloud/faq.html

and also here:

http://blogs.adobe.com/photoshopdotcom/2013/05/answering-your-questions-about-photoshop-cc.html

Please post your comments below.

Alain Briot
www.beautiful-landscape.com

White Sands Gallery

White Sands & Bosque del Apache Gallery

CF020070-600

 



About Alain Briot

Alain Briot creates fine art photographs, teaches workshops and offers DVD tutorials on composition, image conversion, optimization, printing and marketing. Alain is the author of Mastering Landscape Photography. Mastering Photographic Composition, Creativity and Personal Style and Marketing Fine Art Photography. All 3 books are available on as printed books Amazon.com and as eBooks on Alain’s website at this link: http://beautiful-landscape.com/Ebooks-Books-1-2-3.html

You can find more information about Alain’s work, writings and tutorials as well as subscribe to Alain’s Free Monthly Newsletter on his website at http://www.beautiful-landscape.com To subscribe simply go to http://www.beautiful-landscape.com and click on the Subscribe link at the top of the page. You will receive information on downloading the table of contents, plus over 40 free essays by Alain, immediately after subscribing. Alain welcomes your comments on this essay as well as on his other essays available. You can reach Alain directly by emailing him at alain@beautiful-landscape.com.

Alain Briot
Vistancia, Arizona

2013

Sunrise Reflections, Bosque del Apache – How I created this photograph

CF019834-600

Sunrise Reflections, Bosque del Apache – How I created this photograph

1 – How this photograph was created
Each time I visit Bosque del Apache I set it as a goal to take photographs without any birds. This was the first photograph I took that morning. When I created it I believed it would be the best image for that morning and it turned out to be so.

This photograph was taken during our just completed Bosque & White Sands Workshop. The sun was not up yet. I was so convinced that this was a strong image, a ‘keeper’ as they say, that I told the workshop participants that I had created my best image for that morning and that we could leave for breakfast now. Many participants joined me in capturing this scene.  Somehow I knew that this was a strong image, possibly the strongest image I was going to create that morning. How did I know? From experience taking tens of thousands of photographs over many years. In other words, because of practice.

I also don’t use a light meter on my manual camera, instead I set the f-stop and shutter speed based on my evaluation of the light level of the scene. After many years of doing so I have become quite good at it. Usually, I find the perfect exposure after 1 or 2 attempts. That morning I found it at my first attempt. In fact, the photograph above was the first exposure I took that morning. I saw it as a sign that this was a truly exceptional situation.

2 – Skill Enhancement Exercises
Practice finding out if you have a ‘keeper’, when you are working in the field, and when you first see the image on your LCD scren.
– Does doing this come naturally to you?
– Is it challenging?
– If yes, which aspect of this approach is the most challenging?

After returning to your studio, take a look back at the images you believed were ‘keepers.’
– Were you correct? Are these photograph as good as you thought they were once you convert and optimize them ?
– If you were not correct, why do you not like these images as much as you did in the field? What changed?
– If you were correct, what are the strong aspects of these images?
– What is it about them that makes them work visually?

 

 

Sunrise Reflections, Bosque del Apache

3 – About Alain Briot
Alain Briot creates fine art photographs, teaches workshops and offers DVD tutorials on composition, image conversion, optimization, printing and marketing. Alain is the author of Mastering Landscape Photography. Mastering Photographic Composition, Creativity and Personal Style and Marketing Fine Art Photography. All 3 books are available on as printed books Amazon.com and as eBooks on Alain’s website at this link: http://beautiful-landscape.com/Ebooks-Books-1-2-3.html

You can find more information about Alain’s work, writings and tutorials as well as subscribe to Alain’s Free Monthly Newsletter on his website at http://www.beautiful-landscape.com To subscribe simply go to http://www.beautiful-landscape.com and click on the Subscribe link at the top of the page. You will receive information on downloading the table of contents, plus over 40 free essays by Alain, immediately after subscribing. Alain welcomes your comments on this essay as well as on his other essays available. You can reach Alain directly by emailing him at alain@beautiful-landscape.com.

Alain Briot
Vistancia, Arizona
2013

Creativity Top 12

February 19, 2013 Art, Composition, Success No Comments

Creativity Top 12
How to stand out from the crowd 

Introduction
Standing out among the ever-increasing number of photographers is becoming more and more difficult.  Gear and software are getting better and better.  Prices for photography hardware, software are consumables are getting more and more affordable.  Technical training is readily available. Information about locations that were once challenging to find is now just a google click away.

When everyone is photographing the same locations, knowing how to get to these locations is no longer an advantage.  When everyone has access to the same tools, and when these tools are both excellent and affordable, having these tools no longer gives us an advantage.  Mastering chemical photography involved owning gear that was expensive and  learning a process that was challenging. The large amount of time and money required to do this gave chemical photographers a significant advantage. Not so with digital.  While still expensive, digital photography gear is much more affordable than film-based gear.  Training, while still carrying a cost, is also much more affordable.  In addition, the number of teaching venues has literally exploded.

All this means that the advantage inherent in finding locations, owning equipment and knowing how to use it is no longer significant enough to create a noticeable difference between photographers.  As a result the gap between photographers is shriking and  it is becoming increasingly difficult to stand out among the crowd. Furthermore, the number of photographers and the quality of their photographs is not only increasing, it is literally exploding.

However, being different is still possible.  The question is, how do you do it?  How do you stand out?  The answer is two folds.  First, you have to reconsider what are your true advantages.  It may be your personal experience, your background, your upbringing, a specific aspect of your training that nobody else has, a focus on art and technique rather than on technique alone, your connections, a unique expertise in a non-photographic field.  It may also be simply your attitude.

Second, in order to stand out in the environment that I just described you have to do things that the other photographers are not doing.  You have to create photographs that are different from everyone else.  Not because you used different gear and software, but because you used a different approach to creativity.

Creativity is the foundation that will enable you to create photographs that are different.  In turn, and over time, creativity will allow you to develop a photographic style that will be uniquely yours.  The development of a personal style and the demonstration of a personal vision are the ultimate goals.  By achieving these goals you will set yourself apart from the competition in a final manner.

These are long term goals and I address them during my workshops and in my Mastery Workshops on DVD tutorials.  In this essay my goal is to teach you how to become more creative.  Because creativity is a vast subject, I decided to narrow it down by writing a ‘Creativity Top 12′, a list of what I consider to be  the 12 most important aspects of creativity.  Here it is:

1 – Be interesting
Creativity is necessary to generate the interest of our audience and customers.  We will not generate their interest if we are not creative because people have become blasé about old ideas.  There are so many photographers out there that unless our work stands out as being interesting, different and unique we will not get much attention.

2 – Think differently
Being creative is about creating new things out of old things.  Taking old ideas that have proven to be effective in the past and re-inventing them by presenting them under a new appearance is the key to doing this successfully.

3 – Bring in the new
Creativity is an input-output, import-export business.  You can’t lock yourself in a room and expect to be creative all by yourself.  You have to be in contact with other artists and with other ways of doing things in order to foster creativity.  Think of this as a ‘creative think tank’ . The ‘water’ in the tank is the new ideas you bring in.  These new ideas that you bring in push out and replace the ‘old water’ that was previously in the tank.  By doing this regularly you have a constant flow of new ‘water,’ of new ideas.

4 – Get help
Learn from people who have solved problems similar to the ones you face.  Do not reinvent the wheel.  Instead, learn to use the wheel (metaphorically speaking) by studying with people who know how this is done.  The problem at hand here is how to create photographs that are different from everyone else.

5 – Set yourself free
You can’t be creative with your hands tied behind your back, metaphorically speaking.  To unleash your creativity you must cut yourself some slack.  To do so you need to decide what you are willing to do and not do in your work. Don’t be overly conservative.  Instead, push the boundaries and decide to do things you have not tried before or have hesitated doing until now.

6 – Ignore criticism
Creativity is fostered by self confidence.  You can’t be creative while being concerned with potential criticism at the same time.  In order to bring your creative ideas to life, you have to ignore criticism during the creative phase.  Their will be time to consider criticism later on, if and when it comes your way.

Sand Waterfall, Antelope Canyon, Arizona

7 – Get what you need
You need specific resources to give birth to your ideas.  These include classes, tutorials, tools and supplies.

8 – Engage your audience
You can’t be successful in a vacuum.  While your ideas don’t need to be interesting to everyone, they need to be interesting to your specific audience.  Engage in a dialogue with your audience.  Social media, blogging, live presentations, shows and personal conversations work well for this.

9 – Think simple
Simple ideas are easier to implement than complicated ideas.  Doing ‘simple’ is more difficult than doing ‘complicated.’  This is why most people do things complicated way. Learning to simplify takes time, but in the end it will save you massive amounts of time.  Saving time is the goal because we can’t make more time.  Therefore we need to learn how to use our time in the most efficient manner possible.

10 – Try it
Trying creative ideas is the key to success.  This is because there is other effective way of finding out which ideas will work and which ideas will not work. Only by trying new ideas will we find out which ideas work and which ideas do not work.

11 – Do it
Creativity means creating something, not just thinking of creating something!  This means that eventually you have to step up to the plate and get things done.  Create photographs, make prints, show your work to other people, write essays explaining why and how you do what you do and more.

12 – Defy authority
There’s ‘gurus’ out there that have been around and have achieved more than you have.  Just keep in mind that when they started these ‘gurus’ were in the same position you are in.  They were intimidated by  their own, older, ‘gurus.’  They hesitated to do things that had not been proven yet.  However, they succeeded because they did not let those ‘gurus’ intimidate them.  They defied authority and decided to do things their way. Do the same.

About Alain Briot
Alain Briot creates fine art photographs, teaches workshops and offers DVD tutorials on composition, image conversion, optimization, printing and marketing. Alain is the author of Mastering Landscape Photography. Mastering Photographic Composition, Creativity and Personal Style and Marketing Fine Art Photography. All 3 books are available on as printed books Amazon.com and as eBooks on Alain’s website at this link: http://beautiful-landscape.com/Ebooks-Books-1-2-3.html

You can find more information about Alain’s work, writings and tutorials as well as subscribe to Alain’s Free Monthly Newsletter on his website at http://www.beautiful-landscape.com To subscribe simply go to http://www.beautiful-landscape.com and click on the Subscribe link at the top of the page. You will receive information on downloading the table of contents, plus over 40 free essays by Alain, immediately after subscribing. Alain welcomes your comments on this essay as well as on his other essays available. You can reach Alain directly by emailing him at alain@beautiful-landscape.com.

Alain Briot
February 2013

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Fifteen Remarks on Fine Art Photography Composition

January 28, 2013 Art, Composition, Technique 4 Comments

Fifteen Remarks on Fine Art Photography Composition

by
Alain Briot

Imagination is more important than knowledge.
Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.
Albert Einstein

Zabriskie-collage-3-600
Moonset at Sunrize, Zabriskie Point, Death Valley, California

Introduction
What are the most important aspects of composing a Fine Art Photograph?  The answer to this question certainly varies from photographer to photographer because each of us places more importance on some aspects than on others.  What follows is what I personally consider to be the most important aspects of Composition.

This list is excerpted from a longer list that I use for teaching during my workshops and seminars.  The decision to create a shorter list, with only 15 items instead of 37, stemmed from the desire to focus on the essential aspects of composing a fine art photograph regardless of the  subject we are studyphotograph or the specific project we are working on. The resulting list is free from a particular teaching emphasis and represents what I look for in a Fine Art Photograph.

1 – Composition is the strongest way of seeing
This is Edward Weston’s definition of composition
It is still my favorite definition of composition

2 – Composition is not just the placement of objects in the frame
Composition also involves using color, contrast and light
Composition includes post processing in the raw converter and in Photoshop

3 – The goal of composition is to express your vision and your emotional response to the scene
The goal of Fine Art Composition is not to create a documentary representation of the scene
Nor is it to create a photograph that is only technically perfect
The goal is to create an image that is superior, both expressively and technically
An image that demonstrate both mastery of vision and technical virtuosity

4 – What the camera captures is objective.  What the artist’s sees and feels are subjective
Take stock of your emotional response to the scene in front of you
Record those emotions in writing or in audio
Use light, color, contrast, composition and cropping to reproduce these emotions visually
Work on this both in the field and in the studio

5 – Think first about light
A photograph is only as good as the light you use
The subject is less important than the light that illuminates this subject
The best subject in bad light does not make for a good photograph

6 – Use foreground-background relationships
Find a great foreground and place it in front of a great background
Make sure your foreground is large enough to play an important role in the composition

7 – Contrast opposites elements
Human beings think and see in terms of opposites
Therefore this is something everyone can relate to

Examples of opposite elements include:

– Static / moving
– Young / old
– Large / small
– Organic / man made

IMG_2252-600
Cottonwood Trees in Fall Colors, Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

8 – Composing a fine art photograph is not about redoing what someone else has done before
If tempted to redo an image you have seen, just buy the postcard, the book or the poster
You cannot be someone else, therefore you cannot take the same photographs as someone else
You will waste time trying to do so
Instead, start to create your own images right away

9 – Being inspired and redoing someone else’s work are two different things
You can certainly be inspired by the work of other photographers
We have all been inspired by the work of other artists and photographers
This is an inherent aspect of the artistic process

10 – No amount of technology can make up for a lack of inspiration
Cameras and other gears are technical
Inspiration is artistic
The two exist on different planes
Achieving a Personal style in Fine Art means working as an artist not just as a technician

11 – People, not cameras, compose photographs
Certainly, a camera is a necessity
However, your camera cannot compose a photograph anymore than your car can drive itself
You are the one who composes your photographs, not your camera

12 – “Correct” is whatever works when the goal is to create fine art
There is no such thing as “the right thing” in art
“What is Art ?” is a question to which there are many answers
We therefore have to answer this question for ourselves
We are also bound to disagree with others because fine art is a polarized activity.

13 – Straight fine art prints are a myth
All fine art prints are a modification of the image recorded by the camera.
The composition of the image you started in the field is continued in the studio.
This is done through image optimization because colors, contrast, borders, image format, etc. are all part of composition.

14 – The “right” color balance is the strongest way of seeing color
There is no such thing as the “right” color balance in Fine Art
This is because color is one of the ways you express your emotional response to the scene
For this reason, the “right” color balance for a specific image will differ from one  photographer to the next

15 – The finest compositions are those you never saw until you created them
Recreating a composition you saw before is easy
Creating a brand new composition, one you have never seen before, is difficult
This is because doing so requires transforming the natural chaos into an organized image
It involves creating order out of chaos, as Elliott Porter said.

 

About Alain Briot
Alain Briot creates fine art photographs, teaches workshops and offers DVD tutorials on composition, raw conversion, optimization, printing, marketing photographs and more. Alain is also the author of Mastering Landscape Photography and Mastering Photographic Composition, Creativity and Personal Style. All 3 books are available from Alain’s website as well as from Amazon and other bookstores.

You can find more information about Alain’s work, writings and tutorials as well as subscribe to Alain’s Free Monthly Newsletter on his website at http://www.beautiful-landscape.com. You will receive over 40 essays in PDF format, including chapters from Alain’s books, when you subscribe. You can also email your comments or questions to Alain at alain@beautiful-landscape.com

Alain Briot
Vistancia, Arizona
2013

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Alain Briot Personal Style Master Class Updates

January 22, 2013 Art, Success, Technique, Workshops No Comments
Alain Briot Personal Style Master Class Updates
Belwo are the most recent updates made available for the Personal Style Master Class.  These updates are available in the Master Class Updates area on my site.  The link to the updates area was emailed to you when you placed your order.

If you do not have the Personal Style Master Class Workshop on DVD, a detailed description plus a free 20 pages eBook, plus pricing and ordering information are available at this link:  http://beautiful-landscape.com/Articles-DVD-Master-Class-SPO.html

Update #1 – I believe we have entered a new time for art.

Update #2 – Will there be a ‘Part 2′ to the Personal Style Master Class?
This update is in response to questions from Master Class owners about the fact that ‘Part 1′ is present in the title.

Update #3 – Is mastering HDR, texture layering and Instagram enough to create a style?

Update #4 – How long does it take to complete the Personal Style Master Class?

Update #5-  Which photography subjects does the Personal Style Master Class applies to?

If you do not have the Personal Style Master Class Workshop on DVD, a detailed description together with pricing and ordering information are available at this link:
http://beautiful-landscape.com/Articles-DVD-Master-Class-SPO.html 

Alain Briot
Vistancia, Arizona
January 2013
http://www.beautiful-landscape.com

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2012 Year-End Summary

January 12, 2013 Art, Marketing, Success, Workshops No Comments

2012 Year-End Summary

Introduction
This is a summary of my 2012 photographic activities.  This summary is organized by categories.  I have not offered a year-end summary before so this is something new to me.  I decided to do so this year because I believe it is interesting to take a look back at the most significant ‘happenings’ of 2012.

Print sales
2012 marked an increase in number of print sales over 2011.  Both individual prints and Portfolios went through several price increases in 2012, as we do each year, guaranteeing a continued increase in investment value to collectors of my work.

We decided to increase portfolio prices by $1000 each time a copy is sold.  This caused portfolios to reach their highest price point so far.

Investment value
Our regular price increases mean that all prints, Folios and Portfolios purchases increase in value regularly.  If you purchased a print, a Folio or a Portfolio from us the value of your investment has already increased. If you plan to purchase prints, Folios or Portfolios in the future the value of your investment will increase as well because our prices will continue to increase regularly.

You can see my print prices at this link.

Folios and Portfolios update
Folios and Portfolios are released in Limited Editions of 50 copies only. As of January 2013 only 3 copies of the Navajoland Portfolio remain available. The White Sands Folio sold out and is no longer available.

Folios and Portfolios are available in the Print of the month collection at this link.

Publishing
In 2012 I published the 5th Mastery Workshop on DVD: The Personal Style Master Class workshop on DVD.  This is an important release because this tutorial is completely different than the other 4 mastery DVDs.  It is also part 1 of a 2 part series, with part 2 scheduled for release this year, in 2013.  You can see the Mastery Workshop on DVD series at this link.

I published over 20 essays in 2012 on my website and blog as well as on Luminous-Landscape.com where Michael Reichmann publishes Briot’s View, my monthly column, on Naturephotographers.net where I am a Contributing Writer, on NatureScapes.net where I am  a Contributing Editor and on other websites.  These publications are in addition to the more than 75 essays written for the Personal Style Master Class Workshop on DVD series.

Consulting
2012 saw a significant increase in demand for my consulting program. So much so that I had to limit how many students I accept in this program to maintain the personalized attention and high standards I set for this program.  Details of my consulting program are available at this link for studio consulting and at this link for phone consulting.

Workshops
All our workshops sold out including the 9th Annual Fine Art Summit which was held in Zion this year. As an aside the first 3 workshops for 2013 are already sold out.  We have not cancelled a single workshop since we started our workshop program 10 years ago.  A full listing of our 2013 workshop program is available at this link.

Teaching Focus
The focus of our 2012 workshop program was Personal Style.  This focus complemented the new Personal Style Master Class Workshop on DVD and was very popular with our students, many of them working and developing a personal style.

The focus of our 2013 workshop program is Vision.  This new focus builds onto our 2012 focus, Personal Style, while expanding into a wider field of creative exploration.  More information will be available as the year goes on during our workshops, starting with the White Sands Workshop this March.  Stay tuned !

Student Achievements
We saw a noticeable increase in image quality from our students’ work.  Composition is where we saw the most increase.  Print quality is still one of the most challenging aspects of fine art photography.

A record number of students completed personal photography projects in 2012.  These include folios, portfolios, eBooks and self published books.  A number of these projects were completed in the context of my consulting program.  Many were started during our workshops and seminars.

Students in Business
A record number of students started selling their work in 2012.  At a recent show in Scottsdale, Arizona 3 of my students were selling their work at the same show.  Besides Arizona, our students are also selling their work in many states and countries.

This is no doubt due to the popularity of my book Marketing Fine Art Photography.  Each time I check the book listing on Amazon.com, it is in the top 10 books on Professional Photography.  Sales of the eBook version, which is available only on my website, also rank high.  It is also due to the support I provide through my Marketing Mastery Workshop on DVD, my 1 on 1 consulting program and my Advanced Marketing Seminar which took place in Spring 2012.  This seminar was organized at our Country Club, Blackstone, in Peoria, Arizona and it was a wonderful event.

About Alain Briot
Alain Briot creates fine art photographs, teaches workshops and offers DVD tutorials on composition, image conversion, optimization, printing and marketing. Alain is the author of Mastering Landscape Photography. Mastering Photographic Composition, Creativity and Personal Style and Marketing Fine Art Photography. All 3 books are available on as printed books Amazon.com and as eBooks on Alain’s website at this link: http://beautiful-landscape.com/Ebooks-Books-1-2-3.html

You can find more information about Alain’s work, writings and tutorials as well as subscribe to Alain’s Free Monthly Newsletter on his website at http://www.beautiful-landscape.com To subscribe simply go to http://www.beautiful-landscape.com and click on the Subscribe link at the top of the page. You will receive information on downloading the table of contents, plus over 40 free essays by Alain, immediately after subscribing. Alain welcomes your comments on this essay as well as on his other essays available. You can reach Alain directly by emailing him at alain@beautiful-landscape.com.

Alain Briot
Vistancia, Arizona
January 2013


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