Why I Photograph Cars

Why I Photograph Cars

Why I Photograph Cars
by Alain Briot

Desire is the key to motivation, but it’s the determination and commitment
to an unrelenting pursuit of your goal –a commitment to excellence-
that will enable you to attain the success you seek.
Mario Andretti

1 – Introduction
My primary photographic subject is landscape photography.  I came to photograph cars not as a professional occupation, but because I wanted beautiful photographs of my personal cars for my own enjoyment.

In short, car photography was, and still is, a hobby. I enjoy photographing cars to change my mind from landscape photography.  I find car photography to be fun and relaxing.  I photograph my own cars, as well as cars that I like and cars in historical, racing or other interesting settings.

2 – Why I photograph cars
We all have cars.  Or we will all have cars.  That is, unless we committed ourselves to public transportation for the rest of our lives, or resolved ourselves to using a bicycle, or decided that walking will be our only form of locomotion.

While we may own the cars we photograph, many of the cars we want to photograph are not owned by us.  They are either too expensive, too unique, or simply not for sale.  This is the case for race cars, in particular those being raced at the present time, because they are the sole property of the race teams.  It is also the case for unique vehicles that belong to museums or to private collectors and of cars that are simply too pricy to purchase.  Finally, regardless of our level of income, we simply cannot own all the cars we like.  While some succeed at assembling a fascinating collection over many years, doing so is not commonplace.  Furthermore, no matter how much we try, there will always be certain cars that stay away from ownership reach.

Because of this, for many car enthusiasts seeing cars in person and bringing back photographs of these cars is an important aspect of enjoying the vehicles we like.  I should say ‘bringing back good photographs’ or better ‘bringing back great photographs. ‘ This is what this is all about.  Owning a great photograph of a great car is almost as good as owning a great car.  Not quite the same, I agree.  You cannot drive the photograph, you cannot hear the scream of the engine when looking at an image and you do not have the scent of leather, oil and gas. But when you have seen and experienced the real car, a good photograph has the power of bringing this back to you when you look at the image.  Why?  Because a great photograph captures not just the look of the car.  It also captures its soul.

A great photograph captures not only what the car looks like but also, and most importantly, how the car feels. It has the power of bringing back the emotions generated by the car.  It represents what the car means to you, both on a factual and an emotional level.  It also offers the opportunity of sharing your vision with others through your photographs, and of making them see and feel what you saw and felt.

3 – The eBook
I do car photography for my personal enjoyment, my primary photographic activity being landscape photography. However, this series of car photographs has been very well received and I have had a lot of questions about how I created them. I therefore created an eBook to explain how these photographs were created, to express my approach to car photography and to describe my vision.
The Car Photography eBook is avaible for order at this link:
http://beautiful-landscape.com/Ebooks-Books-1-2-3.html

4 – The Folio and eFolio
I also decided to create an eFolio, an electronic version of a Folio, to present a  selection of my favorite car photographs.  Ninety photographs are featured in the eFolio.  These ninety images represent my initial selection from hundreds, if not thousands, of car photographs.

Later this year I plan to release a Folio, a physical collection of 5×7 images printed on 8×10 fine art paper, accompanied by an artist statement, a biography and a colophon and presented in a die-cut Folio enclosure. This physical Folio will feature 15 car photographs.  Therefore, from my eFolio initial selection of 90 images, I will have to remove 75 photographs to get to the final selection of 15 photographs that will be included in the Folio. This will be a tough process since I will have to eliminate about three fourth of the images featured in the eFolio.

The Cars eFolio is available for order at this link:
http://beautiful-landscape.com/Ebooks-Books-1-2-3.html

Alain Briot
Arizona
October 2012

 http://www.beautiful-landscape.com

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New Car Photography eBook

Latest News:


New Ebook on Car Photography by Alain Briot

November 27th

A new eBook is available. It is titled Car Photography by Alain Briot.

For a limited time this new eBook is offered at a special offer price 20% lower than the regular price. Plus, you receive the new Car Photography eFolio, featuring 85 pages of stunning car photographs, free when you place your order.

All the details are at this link:
http://beautiful-landscape.com/Ebooks-Books-1-2-3.html

If you are not sure why I photograph cars, the answer is in the free sampler taht you can download for free at this link:
http://beautiful-landscape.com/Ebooks-Books-1-2-3.html

Alain Briot

Art, equipment and professionalism

Art, equipment and Professionalism

Most art collectors cannot tell an Epson 9880 from a 9900. They buy the image, not the printer.
Alain Briot

An important step in the personal development of a photographer into an artist is to step away from considering the equipment first and the work second. The minute the work comes first and the equipment comes second you are on your way to creating art.

Another important step is when you start to “lag” or “lapse,” intentionally or not, on upgrading your equipment. This lapse represents a switch in your focus from the gear to the work. While there are important milestones in equipment and software acquisition, there is no need to get each and every software package or camera gear that comes out to do meaningful work. In the end, except for the main technical components that define your work (the subject you focus on and the type of prints you make for example), few of the technical specs about the gear and software you use will make it into the memory of the people who admire and collect your art or into “posterity.”

Few people will ever know which version of Photoshop you used to create a specific image. That they know you used Photoshop might be all! Similarly, few people will know what brand of camera you used, and even fewer will know which exact model within that brand. I tend to think that it is the mark of amateurs to list each piece of gear and software they own when talking about their work. Professionals know that this information is far relatively unimportant to collectors. They know that art is about the artist’s vision and not about the gear and software they used.

Professionalism, incidentally, is a state of mind, a personal approach that focuses on dedication and the desire to create quality work. Professionalism is not a financial situation. It is not related to how much money you make, if any, from your photography. Instead, it is related to the attitude you have in regards to your photography. Professionals are committed to achieving the finest results in their work and are willing to do what it takes to reach this goal.

Alain Briot
Arizona

http://www.beautiful-landscape.com

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